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SUCCESSFUL INCUBATIONS

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There have been several other successful incubation recordings within the United States over that last three years (2003-2006). Kamuran Tepedelen, owner of Bushmaster Reptiles, has had the opportunity of acquiring several wild-caught gravid females and having them lay their eggs while in captivity. The first clutch of 13 eggs was set up on vermiculate and incubated at a constant 85 F and hatched around 85-87 days resulting in 11 hatchlings. The second clutch of 16 eggs also on vermiculite incubated at a constant 87 F for 81 days and had a 100% hatch rate. Interestingly enough the next two clutches were placed upon a shelf at the Bushmaster facility when space ran out in the incubators. The first was placed on shelf where the high temperatures reached 88 F. This clutch of 11 eggs hatched on day 72 and had a 100% hatch rate. The second clutch of 16 eggs was placed on a higher shelf and temperatures reached 90 F. This clutch hatched in the least amount of days, 68, Kamuran remarked that these hatchlings were the largest, most robust that he has seen. An important point to consider regarding the clutches incubated on the shelves is that they had to experience temperature and humidity fluctuations throughout incubation. The ambient temperature of the room could not be kept at a constant and yet there was no ill effect on the eggs. This would lead one to believe that Boelen’s Python eggs are more tolerant to environmental changes than once perceived.

Kamuran also has had two clutches that were incubated in Indonesia at the farming facility. Both clutches were incubated at a constant 88 F with 100% hatch rates lasting 81 and 82 days.

 

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Two of Kamuran Tepedelen’s females on eggs at the Bushmaster facility. Photos placed side by side.
Photo by Tepedelen.

 

 

     

© 2007 Marc A. Spataro