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INCUBATION STRATEGIES

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Incubating techniques have proven to be a challenge with this species in some of the recorded breedings. I personally would use the no substrate method and follow the temperature regime I use to hatch my Morelia viridis. This entails incubating at a constant 87.5-88 F and at a humidity level greater than 80%.

Maternal incubation is always a good way to ensure a successful
hatching but like other methods there are inherent risks.
Photo by Baldolgo.

Hatchlings are usually large and robust and act as if they would accept a meal right out of the egg. More importantly is the choice of incubator and its accuracy and consistence to keeping stable temperatures. There are many well crafted incubators being offered to the herpetocultural market. Do your research and choose one that you believe will work best for you. Set the incubator up and have the temperatures establish before the female lays the clutch. This will allow plenty of time to make sure the incubator is operating correctly.

A successful hatching using the no-substrate
technique during incubation.
Photo by Baldogo.

I recommend purchasing several scientific calibrated thermometers and using them together to reassure that the temperatures being measured are exact. Also several good hygrometers to measure humidity accuracy will be needed as well. Since there has been such a broad range of the number of days from the time of laying to the time of hatching it will be hard to calculate exactly when the eggs are due to hatch. Taking the mean average from the recorded breeding's it is safe to assume that near or around day 70 close observations will need to be made.

 

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A female deposits her eggs at one of the Indonesian farms.
Photo by Baldogo.

 

 

     

© 2007 Marc A. Spataro